First off all clients want a "deal" As a painting contractor for 38 years I can tell you that residential-commercial-industrial clients (and their needs are all diffrent. It seems this discussion mostly concerns residential repaints,so here goes--first off ALWAYS get a personal referance from a friend or co-worker. Always get an itemized contract that specifies the prep,color, number of coats, and specifics on payment. Remember you want to set up a relationship with the painting contractor of your choice. Bond, license and insurance are required to get a contractors license and are readily available online at your state Labor and Industries website. Second-- find someone you trust. He or his crew will probably be left alone in your home for most of the time. I always tell my clients that I wont bring someone to their home I wouldnt have in mine. Third--$$ Dont ever pay up front always insist on progress draws if the project is 2 or 3 phases remember If a contractor wants $3000 to do the job and you give him half up front he will be working for $1500. It WILL affect the quality of the product. In 38 years of business I have never taken a deposit and have never not been paid in full remember do what you said you would do for exactly what you said it would cost and there will be no problems with getting paid. one last reminder to clients you are also being evaluated when you interview a contractor. He is sizing you up as well. If he thinks you are a bit sketchy the the price will go up or he wont take the job at all. I have turned down some jobs that looked very profitable on the surface that turned out not to be so.(word gets around fast in the small painting community) Good Luck to clients and contractors
To get basic measurements, measure the length and width of each wall you want to paint in inches. Multiply the length and height together, and divide by 144. This will give you the square footage for each wall. A gallon of paint typically covers around 400 square feet. In some cases, you may need a primer 2 first, then a single coat of paint, meaning that you may need one gallon of primer and one gallon of paint to cover 400 square feet. However, if the wall requires multiple coats, this will increase the total amount of square footage required, and therefore the amount of paint.

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When painting the trim, you don’t have to be neat. Just concentrate on getting a smooth finish on the wood. Don’t worry if the trim paint gets onto the walls. You’ll cover it later when painting the walls. Once the trim is completely painted and dry (at least 24 hours), tape it off (using an “easy release” painter’s tape), then paint the ceiling, then the walls.
If you’re trying to save money, but still want some professional help, consider clearing out a room prior to the paint crews showing up. Removing furniture or climbing over small obstructions can increase the amount of time necessary to finish a job & ultimately increase overhead for a paint crew. Do yourself (and your painters a favor), clear anything out of a room that you don’t want painted.
@Neil What is the use of repeating lessons when there is so much more to be learned? Technology has moved on from the adz. Plumbers use PEC, insulation is sprayed, glue-lams allow for open floor plans and furnaces are no longer stoked with coal. As for the new people, if these trades cannot attract fresh blood we will all be unable to get homes built and repairs made. I don't yearn for my first home with the leaky concrete block foundation, failing well pump and an oil furnace held up by the plenum. I'll take heat pumps, solar panels and PVC waste pipes any day.You can get all the sill plate repairs and flitch beams demos you need on YouTube.
Plastic drop cloths provide an inexpensive way to protect floors and furnishings from paint spatters, but you'd be much better off investing in canvas ones. Canvas is extremely durable and rip-resistant. It lays flat and presents much less of a tripping hazard. Canvas absorbs paint drips, unlike plastic drop cloths, which become slippery when spattered with paint. Canvas drop cloths can be easily folded around corners and doorways, something that's impossible to do with plastic sheeting. Plus, most plastic drop cloths must be tossed out after using. Canvas drop cloths will last a lifetime.
Use what the pros use—canvas drop cloths. They're not slippery and they absorb splatters (but still wipe up large spills or they can bleed through). "Unless you're painting a ceiling, you don't need a jumbo-size cloth that fills the entire room," a pro says. "A canvas cloth that's just a few feet wide and runs the length of the wall is ideal for protecting your floor, and it's easy to move."

Hi Patty, we are currently working on a manual for commercial bidding which we will provide once it’s completed. Most homeowners choose the middle bid believe it or not. Many companies think they have to be the lowest bid, but after setting up over 20,000 estimates, we’ve seen that the homeowner is often scared by the low bid, and thinks the high bid is too pricey. If your bid is in the middle and you present yourself professionally, you’ll have a much better chance of landing the job.
My husband has been a professional painter over 30 years. He prides himself in his high level of work ethic and customer satisfaction. He stays up to date on techniques and finishes. He gives Very detail and accurate appraisals with contracts. At an alarming rate, as he starts to finish the last day or the day before, the client starts nit picking and being disrespectful towards his work when every day prior to that, they were very pleased, as he request ongoing satisfaction throughout the job. Then they don't to want pay remaining balance, bicker about final cost, or stop payment. He has a crew he has to pay whether the customer does or doesn't honor the contract as well as our own household expenses. Wasted time ,labor, money and effort lost. Now how do we fix this? Remind yourself and clients that a contract is based on honor.
Perhaps you don’t know what you want to do, but you know you want a change. If so, you’ll love our color consultation, a free service that comes complimentary after you receive a free quote and sign a contract. A professional colorist will analyze your living space and make recommendations on what colors will work best for your home; you can then work with the colorist in choosing a final plan for your home interior.
You have to start with a perfectly smooth surface to end up with perfectly painted walls or woodwork. One pro tells PM that Sander would be a more fitting job title than Painter since he spends so much time pushing sandpaper. Sanding levels outs spackle or joint-compound patches and flattens ridges around nail holes. Sanding also removes burrs and rough spots in your trim.

I disagree with your criteria to hire a painter. A prompt returned call is nice but does not indicate the quality or fairness of the painter. As far as a written estimate, that should be more of a qualifier for the bid versus an evaluation criterion. I'm not sure one would have favorable results by hiring a painter on this basis. As far as the bidding process, change orders should ONLY be used if the customer requests additional scope (PMP 101). Angie's list should consider asking reviewers if/how much they were told to pay compared with the estimate. Unfortunately, there are a lot of contractors that are unethical and need to be accountable.
Before the project began, Warren walked through the home with myself and the paint foreman and ensured we were all on the same page, the crew worked around our schedule and did an amazing job. The estimate and the final bill were exactly the same, they ensured we were 100% satisfied. Great experience and plan on having them back to finish painting the remaining rooms and the exterior of our home when the time comes. Customer and Quality are their top priorities.  
If you decide to paint multiple rooms in your home, choose colors that relate to one another without being completely the same -- unless uniformity is your goal, of course. Costs may vary based on differences in color, gloss and room size. However, each room will flow depending on the trim's color -- which should all be white or neutral -- so they look connected. A whole-house color scheme presents the same cost factors as painting multiple rooms individually: colors you choose, the gloss, the size of the rooms and time/labor. You can choose to use the same color throughout your entire home to save on money, or you can use a color scheme with the same gloss throughout, though this isn't recommended for selling purposes.
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